The Knowledge: How to Start Weight Training

In this episode, your hosts Mac Cassin and Dr. Jinger Gottschall discuss how to apply strength training to help maintain and support bone density. Is drinking Milk enough to support strong healthy bones? Does training more than 10 hours a week leave me susceptible to losing bone density? Have a listen and then discuss it all here.

Listen to the episode here

Read: The Importance of Strength Training

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Hi Mac & Jinger, I’m interested in the effects of trampolining on bone density and if you have any knowledge of benefits of for example, easy/low & harder/higher bouncing. Also somersaults/flips and the effects on the middle ear/balance as we get older. I guess it leads to a bigger question of what sort of gymnastics are beneficial as a strength program for cyclists?

Interested in this too. And outstanding podcast @Coach.Mac.C and @coach.jinger.g . I was floored by some of the stats you mentioned.

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Thanks for the question! The PodSquad as we dial in our next episodes are working on best ways to reply to the forum in a timely fashion as well potentially recording an episode that directly answers all the great questions we receive here. As the producer of The Knowledge by Wahoo I wanted to ask you if a dedicated episode would be something that is interesting to you?

I’ll also be interested to hear Jinger and Macs take on trampolines. Cheers

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I’d rather see Jinger and Mac ON a trampoline demonstrating some gymnastics routines.

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Yeah a dedicated episode would be great. As an older athlete I’m interested if the force effects on physiology/bone density from trampolines is as good as say plyometrics on harder surfaces, running etc which carry a much higher impact and possibly riskier on knees, ankles etc? And in regard to balance I’m interested in this as some riders seem really steady while others can appear to be not so steady. And as we age can we stimulate our balance mechanism to slow it’s demise (through somersaults or similar). I understand the inner/middle ear activation is really beneficial for infants/kids.

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Thank you for the feedback! Now to find a trampoline for Mac and Jinger… #forscience

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Thank you for your interest in the podcast! It is super cool to hear your critical thinking about strategies to improve bone density and balance. It is not as cool that now the overwhelming suggestion from the team is for Mac and me to start doing tricks on a trampoline!?!? This is not a great idea for anyone! Bah!

With respect to your questions…
(1) Unfortunately the published data on bone density improvement with trampoline jumping is mixed. Astronauts who returned from space used trampoline jumping to stimulate bone formation with positive results while older women did not respond with significant increases. My suggestion is that if you enjoy jumping on a trampoline, keep it up! But try to incorporate weight bearing activities such as walking and hiking as well as weight training also.
(2) In terms of the inner ear (vestibular system) it is definitely beneficial to challenge yourself with movements in all the planes of motion (up/down, left/right, twisting/rolling) as well as single leg balance exercises (check out the balance yoga sessions in SYSTM). As we age, we lose the small hair cells in the inner ear that help us understand where we are in space. The exercises mentioned above can help slow the loss.

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Thanks so much for your response, good to know that putting a bounce into your step is a good thing :slight_smile: Interesting the results of Astronauts v older women.
I’ll check out the balance Yoga sessions for sure. I’ll do anything to defy gravity.

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@coach.jinger.g
I’ll take one for the team and do some trampoline flips…I was all about that as a child/teenager! Now where can I find one in Boulder??! :slight_smile:

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