Standing starts and carbon frame

Hi there’s been a bit online lately about carbon frames on turbo trainers. I’ve got a Tacx flux direct drive trainer and standing starts has appeared in my plan. Is it safe to do these on a carbon frame or better to pass and pic a different session ?

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This is really hard to answer as no one wants anyone to break anything.

If it helps though, I’ve been through loads of standing starts. Hell, even Violator involves 64 …

Nothing broken yet. And that includes an Elite trainer that had zero give in it.

But that’s just my experience with three different carbon frames.

I’m sure I’ve seen over the last few years some companies putting a t&c thing in about not using In trainers but not sure if that’s still the case.

This is my worry. I have a trek emonda sl6 so lightweight climbing bike. I’m not sure how much power I would throw out on a standing start so a little worried having read cycling magazines quoting that some manufacturers don’t recommend the use of a carbon frame on a trainer.

Sadly no-one will provide an ‘answer’ to this one is the basic problem. I guess no-one knows for sure.
Different trainers, different frames … so just a ‘call’ to make.

To my understanding, part of the problem is that carbon frames can fail catastrophically without warning.

I’m thinking I’ll skip this one just to be sure.

Re-upping this topic, since I was just watching a documentary where the lead mechanic of the British national team said that carbon frames should not be on turbo trainers “full stop”.

:flushed: :flushed: :flushed:

Guess I’d not really thought of it, but I’m assuming the basic concern is lateral and torsional rigidity of carbon when locked into a trainer that is, ostensibly, not going allow any movement/flex? Did some research and see a lot of “don’t do it”, and manufacturers claiming voided warranties - though apparently a number of manufacturers are now testing and certifying frames for lateral stresses a la turbo trainers circa 2019+?

How concerned should we be? Honestly my only concern is damaging my “vintage” 2001 TdF USPS bike that I’ve been using as my indoor ride. Also thinking I’m on a Kickr Snap, vs. Direct Drive - wonder how that changes the dynamic?

Maybe carbon bars snapping on the Olympic velodrome have me spooked (Australia. Men’s team pursuit qualifying, I believe. Scary stuff!)

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@CPT_A I ride with a carbon frame on the trainer and don’t think twice about it.

+1 Sir @JSampson although as per Sir @Martin we’ll all have to make our own call.
My 2014 carbon Giant TCR is hooked up to my trainer (TACX Neo 2T) and I have no worries re out of saddle sprinting/ standing starts - initially static set-up but with 4-way Rocker plate for last 6 months.

I - like many - did lots of reading on this and found lots of fear but very few (read: none so far) reports of catastrophic failure where there wasn’t user error (e.g. skewer tightening). With so many people on trainers and many many using carbon bikes you’d think the internet would be flooded with reports of failure if they were happening. For those that have occurred/ will occur - are the numbers more or less than those of failures out on the road/ trail/ track?

That said, although rocker plates didn’t come into being to protect carbon frames, the movement they allow reduces the forces the frame would otherwise have to cope with - a bonus of added protection for a special bike @CPT_A?

Finally - here’s an interesting article. Note the bit about alloy frames …

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